Fall 2015

Conflict Shorelines I / Amazonia: A Botanical Archaeology of Genocide

This course explores the relations among colonial history, contemporary conflicts, and climate change by examining the political, legal, epistemic, and aesthetic challenges this kind of violence initiates. Reading colonial and urban histories against meteorological and climate data, we use environmental modes of detection and imaging in order to reveal tropical forests to be archaeological resources in which patterns of human intervention and violence can be read. The Amazon is not only an ecological threshold, but also a political one, and it continues to bear the traces of the deadliest land conflicts in Brazil.

Instructors: Eduardo Lujan Cadava, Paulo Roberto Carvalho Tavares, Eyal Weizman
The Arts of Urban Transition

This interdisciplinary course uses texts and methods from history, theatre, and dance to examine artists and works of art as agents of change in New York (1960-present) and contemporary Detroit. Issues include relationships between artists, changing urban economies, and the built environment; gentrification and creative placemaking; local history in art interventions; and impacts of urban arts initiatives. A fall break studio trip to Detroit, and visits to archives and sites in New York, are included. Students will use data and methods from the course to produce final creative projects.

Instructors: Judith Hamera, Aaron Landsman, Aaron Peter Shkuda
Topics in Domestic Policy Analysis: Planning Methods and The Bronx

The future of the Bronx is not yet written. As urban communities across the US experience resurgence & gentrification, propelled by demographic, technological & cultural trends, The Bronx remains an amalgamation of urban conditions in a diverse range of communities & conditions. This course demonstrates the necessity for solutions that integrate architecture & economic development, urban design & public services, cultural history & a public realm strategy, investment & policy. The course investigates new models for equitable & sustainable growth in US cities.

Instructors: M. Christine Boyer, Thomas K. Wright
Urban Studies Research Seminar

This interdisciplinary seminar introduces research methods in urban studies. We will focus on some of the ways in which researchers make sense of cities, including various aspects of urban experience, culture, history, theory, form, and policy. Students will use the analytical frameworks covered in the course to develop their own research projects with the goal of developing more dynamic junior papers and senior theses.

Instructors: Bruno M. Carvalho, Aaron Peter Shkuda

Fall 2015

Conflict Shorelines I / Amazonia: A Botanical Archaeology of Genocide

This course explores the relations among colonial history, contemporary conflicts, and climate change by examining the political, legal, epistemic, and aesthetic challenges this kind of violence initiates. Reading colonial and urban histories against meteorological and climate data, we use environmental modes of detection and imaging in order to reveal tropical forests to be archaeological resources in which patterns of human intervention and violence can be read. The Amazon is not only an ecological threshold, but also a political one, and it continues to bear the traces of the deadliest land conflicts in Brazil.

Instructors: Eduardo Lujan Cadava, Paulo Roberto Carvalho Tavares, Eyal Weizman
The Arts of Urban Transition

This interdisciplinary course uses texts and methods from history, theatre, and dance to examine artists and works of art as agents of change in New York (1960-present) and contemporary Detroit. Issues include relationships between artists, changing urban economies, and the built environment; gentrification and creative placemaking; local history in art interventions; and impacts of urban arts initiatives. A fall break studio trip to Detroit, and visits to archives and sites in New York, are included. Students will use data and methods from the course to produce final creative projects.

Instructors: Judith Hamera, Aaron Landsman, Aaron Peter Shkuda
Topics in Domestic Policy Analysis: Planning Methods and The Bronx

The future of the Bronx is not yet written. As urban communities across the US experience resurgence & gentrification, propelled by demographic, technological & cultural trends, The Bronx remains an amalgamation of urban conditions in a diverse range of communities & conditions. This course demonstrates the necessity for solutions that integrate architecture & economic development, urban design & public services, cultural history & a public realm strategy, investment & policy. The course investigates new models for equitable & sustainable growth in US cities.

Instructors: M. Christine Boyer, Thomas K. Wright
Urban Studies Research Seminar

This interdisciplinary seminar introduces research methods in urban studies. We will focus on some of the ways in which researchers make sense of cities, including various aspects of urban experience, culture, history, theory, form, and policy. Students will use the analytical frameworks covered in the course to develop their own research projects with the goal of developing more dynamic junior papers and senior theses.

Instructors: Bruno M. Carvalho, Aaron Peter Shkuda